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Knowledge Management – what’s happening?

Here are some quotes I lifted off an old IBM slide pack published by Jennifer Okimoto and uploaded to Slideshare.net by Elusa (Luis Suarez) on Knowledge Management (KM):

You can’t manage knowledge – nobody can. What you can do is to manage the environment in which knowledge can be created, discovered, captured, shared, distilled, validated, transferred, adopted, adapted and applied.” Chris Collison and Geoff Parcell, Learning to Fly: Practical Knowledge Management from Leading and Learning Organizations

“…if you ask someone, or a body for specific knowledge in the context of a real need it will never be refused. If you ask them to give you knowledge on the basis that you may need it in the future, then you will never receive it.” David Snowden, Cognitive Edge

“…the focus is pretty much around the subject of people…And, like we all know, a successful KM strategy is one that combines into a perfect balance a focus on the people, on the tools and on the processes.” Luis Suarez, IBM

It seems that discussions on Knowledge Management peaked in early 2000s and less research has been undertaken recently except for highlighting relevant technologies of Web 2.0 as KM 2.0. Does this mean that most corporations have addressed knowledge management needs within thier enterprises successfully or is it simply not an issue anymore due to wide availability of web 2.0 tools? What is the impact of web 2.0 into previous KM investments? Has web 2.0 made most investments redundant? Perhaps it’s time to give this subject a bit more voice..

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  • Knowledge Management is alive and well and evolving to meet a web 2.0 world.

    I manage a KM team in IBM Rational’s Client Support organization. In 2006, RCS invested in a small KM team, whose job it was to manage the support knowledge base. It was good, but not very scalable. For the past couple of years, we’ve been evolving to a Knowledge-Centered Support model. Content is EVERYONE’s business. Real-time publishing. “Just in time”, not “just in case”.

    Luis has it pegged, but I would take it one step further. Culture first, process second, and tooling third.

    So KM 2.0 is alive and well, and is evolving to increase the number of knowledge workers. We ALL are knowledge workers.

    It’s an exciting place to be. 🙂

  • Knowledge Management is alive and well and evolving to meet a web 2.0 world.

    I manage a KM team in IBM Rational’s Client Support organization. In 2006, RCS invested in a small KM team, whose job it was to manage the support knowledge base. It was good, but not very scalable. For the past couple of years, we’ve been evolving to a Knowledge-Centered Support model. Content is EVERYONE’s business. Real-time publishing. “Just in time”, not “just in case”.

    Luis has it pegged, but I would take it one step further. Culture first, process second, and tooling third.

    So KM 2.0 is alive and well, and is evolving to increase the number of knowledge workers. We ALL are knowledge workers.

    It’s an exciting place to be. 🙂